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10189 North 4800 West  Highland, UT 84003

We are the music makers, 

and we are the dreamers of dreams.

-Arthur O’Shaughnessy (but probably used best by Willy Wonka)

THE DAY-BY-DAY

Here's what just happened.

09/20 (a) & 09/21 (b)

We talked some more about flow today, and you had some time to finish up your Betty Botter-type poem (which for most people meant labeling examples of alliteration, assonance, and consonance.) 

Next, we moved on to something tougher: the sonnet.  Sure, Eminem is a flow master, but Shakespeare was the Flow Master.  He was hitting rhythm hard over 500 years ago, using the elements of flow mentioned above, plus meter and rhyme.  Rhyme scheme we went over in class, but we simplified meter by looking at how Shakespeare used the same number of syllables in every line of his sonnets, and by which syllables are stressed (emphasized).  We looked at Sonnet 18, "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day?" as an example, then I showed you a couple other examples that used the exact same structure as Shakespeare's, just with different syllable counts: 

 After that, I turned you loose to write your own.  Why? Because they're hard.  You have to really think to make sure you have everything in place.  And thoughtful writing is a really good habit to have.​

What's Due

The sonnet!  Yep, 14 lines of equal-syllabic glory.  The requirements (check Sonnet 18 above for reference on how it supposed to look):

  • Can be about anything (even how much you hate sonnets)

  • Must be 14 lines

  • The lines must be divided into three stanzas of four lines (quatrains) and one stanza of two lines (couplet)

  • Every line must have the same number of syllables (you should be doing a lot of finger counting)

  • It must follow an abab cdcd efef gg rhyme scheme

  • It does NOT have to be in "old English" (see "Large Burrito" above)

  • You have to be happy when you write it.  Just kidding.  Be ornery, but persistent—this is about the struggle of having to think.

 

If you're super-proud of what you've written, you can read it on The Soapbox for extra credit.